Care coordination efforts for seniors hinge on Supreme Court Affordable Care Act decision

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If the Supreme Court deems the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional, the jobs of hundreds of federal workers hired to implement policies that affect nursing homes will be at stake, new reports suggest.

Funding from the ACA was used to create the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation, which has been tasked with improving care delivery to Medicare and Medicaid recipients and dual eligibles. Individuals who qualify for both Medicare and Medicaid often are among the sickest nursing home residents.

Since the legislation was passed in 2010, the HHS workforce has grown by approximately 4,600 new jobs. Many of those employed work for offices that are installing Medicare and Medicaid overhauls.

While few think that providers would recoup money if the ACA is struck down, experts told Politico they are less certain about what would happen to accountable care organizations and funding for the Innovation Center.

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