Card-check battle leaves all combatants worse for wear

Share this article:
Sen. Arlen Specter (D-PA)
Sen. Arlen Specter (D-PA)
The apparent demise of a bill intended to make it easier for unions to form has left nearly all sides bloodied from battle.

Two esteemed senators caved into pressure and reversed prior support. Business groups that for years had no trouble with inane rulings by a packed National Labor Relations Board (that just happened to invariably favor their positions) were suddenly defending secret union elections as a central tenet of democracy. And a blatant attempt by union groups to grab power and swell their ranks was exposed for being just that.

That's one win for those against the new labor law, a loss for those for it and a huge drop in credibility for all involved.

Now that the Employee Free Choice Act is essentially dead, it's tempting to point out that a win-at-all-costs mentality drove and undermined the debate. Except there's one problem: The fight may not really be over. Continuing attempts to use disinfomercials and parsed polls may be intended as much for the next round as the last one.

Also, a slightly modified version of the bill could regain the senators' support. Round two promises to be equally nasty and underhanded.
Share this article:
close

Next Article in News

More in News

Long-term care continues to lead in deal volume and value: PwC report

Long-term care continues to lead in deal volume ...

Long-term care bucked healthcare industry trends with strong merger and acquisition activity in the second quarter of 2014, according to newly released data from professional services firm PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Empowering nurse practitioners could reduce hospitalizations from SNFs, study finds

Granting more authority to nurse practitioners is associated with reduced hospitalization of skilled nursing facility residents, according to recently published findings.

Pioneer ACO drops out of program, despite reductions in skilled nursing utilization

A California healthcare system has become the latest dropout from the Pioneer Accountable Care Organization program, despite reducing skilled nursing facility utilization and improving its readmission rates. Sharp HealthCare announced its decision in a quarterly financial statement released Tuesday.