Bill would allow Medicare to pay for adult day care services

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In a move sure that would further shift the focus of long-term care away from nursing homes and toward other home- and community-based services, Rep. Linda Sanchez (D-CA) Thursday introduced a bill that would allow Medicare to pay for adult day care services.

Under the Medicare Adult Day Care Services Act of 2009, seniors and those with disabilities who qualify for home-care services would be able to choose whether they would like to receive care at home or at an adult day care center. Currently, adult day care is not covered under Medicare, which would pay adult day care providers 98% of the home-health rate, according to a statement made by Sanchez. Adult day care centers typically provide skilled nursing, physical therapy, social services and personal care for adults who require assistance, but not 24-hour care, Sanchez says.

In early 2008, reports began to emerge that showed demand for adult day care services rising between 5% and 15% every year. (McKnight's, 1/11/08) Sanchez's bill has been referred to the House Committee on Ways and Means, where it awaits deliberation and voting.
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