Bill calls for pharma to compensate for 'doc fix' solution; would readjust dual-eligibles payment

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Sen. Jay Rockefeller
Sen. Jay Rockefeller

 

Senator Jay Rockefeller wants provider groups to support his Medicare Part D plan for a drug rebate bill that calls for money from pharmaceutical companies to replace funds lost from the sustainable growth rate (SGR) removal.

The chair of the Senate Finance Committee's Health Care Subcommittee would earmark the money to reimburse doctors via Medicare. Letters dated Nov. 15 voiced his position to more than 60 organizations.

The chairman of the Senate Finance Committee's Health Care Subcommittee seeks support for the rebate bill, which would reimburse physicians under Medicare.

“The Medicare Drug Savings Act (S. 740, H.R. 1588) is a sensible way to pay for replacing” the sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula, the West Virginia democrat said.

Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Calif.) sponsored the companion bill (H.R. 1588) (74 HCDR, 4/17/13).

Rockefeller also said in his letter that his bill “would return drug pricing for the dual-eligibles to the same mechanism that was used prior to the passage of Part D and still for the Medicaid program, a mechanism that would not harm patients, doctors or hospitals in any way.”

The Center for Medicare Advocacy and Medicare Rights Center supports the plan. The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America opposes the bill.

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