Average CCRC director salary reaches $148,000, survey finds

Share this article:
Average CCRC director salary reaches $148,000, survey finds
Average CCRC director salary reaches $148,000, survey finds
Continuing care retirement community executive directors are earning an average annual salary of $148,007 this year, which is close to a 6% increase from 2012, according to a new report.

CCRC chief financial officers and controllers saw comparable salary increases as executive directors, the report states.

The average annual salary for nursing home administrators working in CCRCs increased about 2%, reaching $99,783. Nursing home assistant administrators took a hit in the last year, with average annual salary decreasing 7% to $79,000.

The Hospital & Healthcare Compensation Service based the report on information from 515 CCRCs nationwide, of which about 80% were not-for-profit. The “Continuing Care Retirement Community Salary & Benefits Report 2013-2014” is endorsed by LeadingAge.

The report also includes information such as turnover rates, position vacancy rates and nursing staff on duty per shift, as well as salary data broken down by region. It is available for purchase online.

A nursing home salary and benefits report will be released later this month, according to HHCS.

Share this article:

More in News

A small team of workers responds best in emergencies, expert says

A small team of workers responds best in ...

Long-term care providers should consider a "flat" crisis management approach that relies on a core group of staff members, experts advised Wednesday at the LeadingAge annual conference.

Nursing homes have better pain and catheter management if leaders have more ...

Nursing homes led by administrators and directors of nursing with higher levels of education and certification have better outcomes on some key quality measures, according to recently published findings.

Court green-lights charges that a healthcare network underused observation stays

A whistleblower can continue to pursue charges that a Nevada healthcare network routinely admitted people as hospital inpatients when they should have been placed in observation status, a federal appeals court recently ruled.