Average annual private nursing home room charge hits $90,520, survey shows

Share this article:
Nursing home pay-for-performance program yields mixed results, report says
Nursing home pay-for-performance program yields mixed results, report says

The national average annual charge for a private nursing home room rose to $90,520 this year, while semi-private rooms climbed to $81,030 and assisted living residency jumped to $42,600, according to figures from the 10th annual MetLife survey of eldercare costs, which was released Tuesday.

Average charges for private nursing home rooms rose 3.8% (to $239 per day); semi-private nursing home rooms jumped 3.7% (to $222 daily); and assisted living base rates increased 2.1% (to $3,477 monthly), according to the 2012 MetLife Market Survey of Nursing Home, Assisted Living, Adult Day Services and Home Care Costs.

Also according to the survey, homemakers services rose (from $19 to $20 per hour), while the areas of home health aides ($21 per hour) and adult day services ($70 per day) were unchanged.

In the past five years, annual costs for a private room in a nursing home averaged a 4% increase, while a semi-private room cost up to 3.8% more. The increase in assisted living costs was the greatest at 4.1% annually.

The survey includes state-by-state figures and Alaska again had the highest costs for nursing home care at $687 (private) and $682 (semi-private) per day. Oklahoma (excluding Oklahoma City and Tulsa) had the lowest private room nursing home rates at $147 per day. Semi-private rooms in Texas (excluding Austin, Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston) had the lowest average rates at $131 per day.

Share this article:

More in News

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in two years: Avalere

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in ...

More than three-quarters of Medicaid beneficiaries will be enrolled in a managed care plan as of 2016, according to an Avalere Health analysis released Thursday. The numbers reveal that managed ...

Nursing home asked for employee's personal information too often, jury rules

The human resources department of a Maine nursing home did not properly protect a former employee's personal identification information, a jury recently ruled.

Test could confirm sepsis within an hour

Nursing home residents might benefit from a new way of diagnosing and treating sepsis made possible by discoveries out of the University of British Columbia.