Assisted living worker shot to death in Alaska, resident claims responsibility

Share this article:

 

An Alaska man has been charged with murdering a worker at a small assisted living facility in Anchorage, according to local news reports.


The suspect, 51-year-old Paul Miller, was a resident at the Allison Assisted Living Home, where the incident took place on Tuesday evening. Miller reportedly contacted 911 at about 5:15 p.m. and said that he had just shot a worker at Allison, local reports state. Police arrived to find Miller seated in his motorized wheelchair outside the building, according to local NBC affiliate KTUU.


The victim, 63-year-old Eduardo Escalante, was found dead inside the facility with multiple gunshot wounds, police stated. Escalante reportedly moved to Anchorage from the Philippines in March and worked at Allison with his wife.


Miller appeared in court on Wednesday, where a judge set his bail at $500,000 cash. He faces first- and second-degree murder charges and could face 99 years in prison for each, according to Alaska Dispatch News.


Miller has “a lengthy criminal record,” the Dispatch News reported, including trespassing, disorderly conduct and multiple assault convictions.


The facility was licensed to house up to five residents, the Dispatch News reported. This is the second high-profile investigation in a week at a small assisted living facility. Authorities in Georgia discovered a body buried on the grounds of an assisted living home and have filed charges against a worker.

 

Share this article:

More in News

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in two years: Avalere

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in ...

More than three-quarters of Medicaid beneficiaries will be enrolled in a managed care plan as of 2016, according to an Avalere Health analysis released Thursday. The numbers reveal that managed ...

Nursing home asked for employee's personal information too often, jury rules

The human resources department of a Maine nursing home did not properly protect a former employee's personal identification information, a jury recently ruled.

Test could confirm sepsis within an hour

Nursing home residents might benefit from a new way of diagnosing and treating sepsis made possible by discoveries out of the University of British Columbia.