Assisted Living Concepts appoints former AHCA head to interim president and CEO post

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Assisted Living Concepts announced that the former head of the American Health Care Association, Charles “Chip” Roadman II, M.D., will serve as its interim president and CEO.

Wisconsin-based Assisted Living Concepts, which operates 200 assisted living facilities in 20 states, announced Roadman's appointment on Tuesday following news that the board had fired President and CEO Laurie Bebo, who had served as president and CEO since the company went public in 2006.

ALC has been under fire from regulators in recent months. State inspectors in Idaho shuttered a Twin Falls facility due to inadequate staffing in April. State inspections uncovered similar staffing violations in several Georgia and Alabama communities too, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported.

Roadman, who is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology, also has served as surgeon general of the U.S. Air Force. He was the head of AHCA from 1999 to 2004. He currently is a professor at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in Bethesda, MD.

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