Assisted living community employee drew gun on coworkers in post-termination rage, prosecutors say

Share this article:

A former assisted living community employee faces multiple felony charges after allegedly wielding a gun and attacking his colleagues in Mishawaka, Ind.

Prosecutors say that Jeffrey Lamont Reid, 23, shoved his supervisor into a wall when in her office to sign his termination papers, according to local reports. He then tried to attack another woman in the office, threw a bottle of hand sanitizer, pushed over a desk and threw a computer on the floor, an affidavit reportedly states.

Reid left his supervisor's office and assaulted an employee in the hall, throwing an unopened can of soup and hitting the employee in the neck, according to the affidavit.

A group of employees ultimately escorted Reid out of the Emeritus facility, Tanglewood Trace Assisted Living Community. But when he drove away, Reid pointed a gun at the employees and cursed at them, they reported.

Reid was vetted through federal and state background checks and had never shown signs of erratic behavior, according to the regional director of operations for Tanglewood Trace, Timothy Marzec.

Since the incident, the facility has instated a 24-hour security guard, installed security locks and limited access to a building entrance, Marzec said in a statement to the South Bend Tribune.

Reid, who worked as a dishwasher at the facility, faces three felony counts of pointing a firearm and one count of intimidation.

Share this article:

More in News

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in two years: Avalere

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in ...

More than three-quarters of Medicaid beneficiaries will be enrolled in a managed care plan as of 2016, according to an Avalere Health analysis released Thursday. The numbers reveal that managed ...

Nursing home asked for employee's personal information too often, jury rules

The human resources department of a Maine nursing home did not properly protect a former employee's personal identification information, a jury recently ruled.

Test could confirm sepsis within an hour

Nursing home residents might benefit from a new way of diagnosing and treating sepsis made possible by discoveries out of the University of British Columbia.