Aspirin inhibits chronic wound healing, providers should dispense it with caution, researchers warn

Share this article:

Long-term care professionals might want to opt for non-aspirin pain relievers for residents with chronic wounds, as researchers have discovered that aspirin appears to suppress healing.

Investigators affiliated with various universities in Japan conducted experiments on diabetic mice with wounds. In one, they discovered that high-dose aspirin reduces the production of a molecule called 12-HHT, which promotes skin healing by spurring the movement of keratinocytes. The migration of keratinocyte skin cells across the wound is an important part of restoring the outermost layer of skin.

"This study describes a novel mechanism for aspirin's effect in delaying wound healing and suggests that aspirin should be used with caution in patients with chronic wounds," said lead author Takehiko Yokomizo, M.D., Ph.D., of Kyushu University.

In another experiment, the researchers discovered that introducing a “synthetic mimic” of BLT2 — the receptor for 12-HHT — accelerated healing in the mice. This suggests a potential proactive therapy to treat stubborn wounds, they noted.

Findings appear in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Share this article:

More in News

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in two years: Avalere

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in ...

More than three-quarters of Medicaid beneficiaries will be enrolled in a managed care plan as of 2016, according to an Avalere Health analysis released Thursday. The numbers reveal that managed ...

Nursing home asked for employee's personal information too often, jury rules

The human resources department of a Maine nursing home did not properly protect a former employee's personal identification information, a jury recently ruled.

Test could confirm sepsis within an hour

Nursing home residents might benefit from a new way of diagnosing and treating sepsis made possible by discoveries out of the University of British Columbia.