Aspirin inhibits chronic wound healing, providers should dispense it with caution, researchers warn

Share this article:

Long-term care professionals might want to opt for non-aspirin pain relievers for residents with chronic wounds, as researchers have discovered that aspirin appears to suppress healing.

Investigators affiliated with various universities in Japan conducted experiments on diabetic mice with wounds. In one, they discovered that high-dose aspirin reduces the production of a molecule called 12-HHT, which promotes skin healing by spurring the movement of keratinocytes. The migration of keratinocyte skin cells across the wound is an important part of restoring the outermost layer of skin.

"This study describes a novel mechanism for aspirin's effect in delaying wound healing and suggests that aspirin should be used with caution in patients with chronic wounds," said lead author Takehiko Yokomizo, M.D., Ph.D., of Kyushu University.

In another experiment, the researchers discovered that introducing a “synthetic mimic” of BLT2 — the receptor for 12-HHT — accelerated healing in the mice. This suggests a potential proactive therapy to treat stubborn wounds, they noted.

Findings appear in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Share this article:

More in News

Breier named new CEO at Kindred

Breier named new CEO at Kindred

Kindred Healthcare announced Thursday that it has chosen a new top executive to lead its push toward creating a mammoth national brand. Benjamin A. Breier, the company's current president and ...

Proposed managed care rule could accelerate shift away from nursing home care, official suggests

Proposed managed care rule could accelerate shift away ...

Proposed regulations slated for early 2015 likely will affect how Medicaid managed care balances home- versus facility-based long-term care, news sources reported Wednesday.

Assisted living residents say 'homelike' setting not so important

Contrary to conventional wisdom, assisted living residents might not place a high value on how "homelike" their surroundings are, suggest findings out of St. Catherine University in St. Paul, MN.