Ask the treatment expert

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Ask the treatment expert
Ask the treatment expert
I hear rumors that Polaroid is going to quit making instant film. Is this true? 
If so, what should we do for our wound photography?

On Feb. 8, Polaroid Corporation announced that it would discontinue production of all instant film. The decision was based upon consumers moving into the digital age. Many long-term care facilities currently use the Polaroid spectra system for wound photos and documentation, and will need to transition over to a digital camera. 

The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel recommends using a digital camera with a minimum of 3 megapixels for wound photography. The higher the megapixels a camera produces, the clearer and more detailed the photograph will be.

Some tips for digital wound photography

1. Position the camera at a standard distance from the wound (usually about four feet), as photographs taken at closer range could result in the wound appearing relatively larger than it is.

2. Take the photographs at a consistent angle; even a slight deviation can change perspective, depth and shadow. 

3. Be sure the resident is comfortably situated in the anatomically correct position, with the wound as far from the sleep surface as possible.

4. Every photograph should include a measurement grid adjacent the wound, preferably in centimeters and millimeters.

5. Remember to wear protective gloves whenever there is a risk your hands may become exposed.
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