AHCA: Americans want to avoid cuts to nursing homes in 'fiscal cliff' negotiations

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While Congressional lawmakers continue to negotiate avoiding the looming so-called fiscal cliff, a long-term care provider group reports Americans oppose cutting Medicare payments to nursing homes.

Opinion Access conducted a national survey of over 800 registered voters and reported that 37% said that cutting the payments was the least acceptable way to lower the national deficit. Survey results were released Monday by the American Health Care Association, which sponsored the survey.

Almost half of respondents said the government should not only avoid cuts to providers, but also give more money to nursing homes to care for baby boomers, the nursing home association reported.

As House Republicans released a $2.2 trillion counteroffer Monday, Politico reported GOP aides have been discussing raising the Medicare eligibility age as a possible part of a solution. Another idea floated by both sides is requiring wealthier Medicare beneficiaries to pay more for their care, the Associated Press reports. 

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