Affordable Care Act designates $52 million to help disabled, veterans avoid nursing homes

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Kathy Greenlee
Kathy Greenlee

Additional government funding is being distributed for a program to keep seniors, disabled individuals and the veterans in their homes, and out of institutionalized long-term care facilities.

Nearly every state will receive a piece of the $25 million authorized under the Affordable Care Act. The Aging and Disability Resource Centers are meant to be a “one-stop shop” for elderly and disabled individuals who want to receive care in their homes and communities, rather than a long-term care facility. The funds will be made available over a one- to three-year period.

As part of the initiative, the Veterans Health Administration will funnel an additional $27 million over three years to ADRC-funded states to help disabled veterans remain in their communities. Eight states will be selected for fast-track implementation of the program.

The ADRCs will provide counseling services for those looking for access to services such as transportation to rehabilitation therapy, home health and support with activities of daily living.

“Options counseling is an important tool that can provide custom-tailored advice about all the services available in a person's community, reducing unnecessary time and energy spent searching for answers in a variety of places,” Kathy Greenlee, administrator for the Administration for Community Living, said.

This program is being administered through a partnership between the new Administration for Community Living, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration.

Click here and here for more information on funding for the program.

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