60 Seconds with...Larry Minnix

Share this article:
Larry Minnix, LeadingAge president and CEO
Larry Minnix, LeadingAge president and CEO
Q: What is the next big issue, post-CLASS Act?

A: This is an era of transformation. What we're saying to our members is over the next decade it's probably going to be the greatest change that our members have encountered in generations.

Q: What will be needed?

A: The triple-aim we've got to really figure out is how to focus on resident-centered care. We're going to have to figure out how to create much better community approaches to services. And the result of that, we already know through smaller pilot efforts, is that you can increase people's quality of life at less cost. That's really the objective of the next decade.

Q: LeadingAge just celebrated its 50th anniversary. What do you see as opportunities and challenges for the association's next 50 years?


A: No. 1 is the transformation. No. 2, we've got to look at ways to finance everything we're doing differently. We're really focusing on human resources, as we call it, the “talent side” … how to attract and retain the next generations. And interestingly enough, how to attract and retain current generations of people who might normally think of themselves as retired but who have an important role to play.
Share this article:

More in News

Long-term care continues to lead in deal volume and value: PwC report

Long-term care continues to lead in deal volume ...

Long-term care bucked healthcare industry trends with strong merger and acquisition activity in the second quarter of 2014, according to newly released data from professional services firm PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Empowering nurse practitioners could reduce hospitalizations from SNFs, study finds

Granting more authority to nurse practitioners is associated with reduced hospitalization of skilled nursing facility residents, according to recently published findings.

Pioneer ACO drops out of program, despite reductions in skilled nursing utilization

A California healthcare system has become the latest dropout from the Pioneer Accountable Care Organization program, despite reducing skilled nursing facility utilization and improving its readmission rates. Sharp HealthCare announced its decision in a quarterly financial statement released Tuesday.