60 Seconds with...Kathleen Sebelius

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HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius
HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius
Q: Why is the administration now committing $156 million over two years to fight Alzheimer's disease?

A: As many as 5.1 million Americans currently suffer from Alzheimer's disease. And that number is quickly growing. As the U.S. population ages, the number of people with this terrible disease could double or more by 2050.
In addition to causing devastating pain and loss, Alzheimer's also carries a steep economic price.

Q: Haven't others proposed less?

A: We can't delay our work to find treatments and a cure.  Nor can we delay our work to provide critical support to Americans struck by the disease and those who care for them every day.

Q: How will the funding start?

A: The first $50 million will be made immediately available to the National Institutes of Health for research to identify effective treatments, delay of disease progression, and ultimately, even prevention of Alzheimer's altogether.

Q: Isn't there more coming?

A: This initiative also includes $26 million to support education to improve the public's understanding of the disease [and] outreach to healthcare providers so they have the best available information about diagnosis, treatment and support for those with the disease.
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