60 Seconds with...Cheryl Phillips, M.D.

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Cheryl Phillips, M.D.
Cheryl Phillips, M.D.
Q: Why are we hearing so much about reducing unnecessary use of antipsychotics?

A: What's behind the push, frankly, is CMS and Congress. But we're not just being reactive. Many providers have been working hard at the local level to do a better job of dementia care.

Q: Are SNFs being singled out?

A: This isn't just a nursing home challenge. They're being prescribed in hospitals and assisted living, too.

Q: How are providers responding?

A: LeadingAge has been very involved. Advancing Excellence has taken it on as one of its quality goals. AHCA also has come out with its quality goal for antipsychotic use, so the nursing care service spectrum has found this and is reacting. All these forces can be aligned for a common good.

Q: Won't this mean hiring more hands for needed care?


A: Maybe, but we can also use staff differently. Frankly, the use of antipsychotics requires staff and demands more documentation. People who are sedated need more helps with ADLs [activities of daily living]. Part of it is: Do we have an adequately prepared staff? Right now, we have some people who don't make very efficient use of their time.
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