60 seconds with ... Rep. Diane Black

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Rep. Diane Black (R-TN)
Rep. Diane Black (R-TN)

Q: You recently introduced a bipartisan bill to create a bundled payment system that would give a lump sum to acute and post-acute providers for a single episode of care. What makes your plan different?

A: My legislation builds upon some existing programs, but allows for a longer period of care under the post-acute bundle. Most importantly, this bill creates a permanent model, which allows providers needed certainty to make long-term decisions.

Q: Your model would provide bundled payments only for certain conditions, such as hip replacements. Why these conditions?

A: The conditions specified in the Comprehensive Care Payment Innovation Act are some common conditions that are typically scheduled in advance. The Secretary of Health and Human Services would have the discretion to build upon the scope of coverage by including additional conditions.

Q: What are the main benefits of bundled payments?

A: Bundled payments can help providers coordinate care at a lower cost to taxpayers. We will allow providers to follow the patient from initial hospitalization to completion of post-acute care. This gives caregivers flexibility to take any necessary steps and to ensure they can deliver quality outcomes.


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