60 Seconds with Gary Kelso, Chairman AHCA Not-for-Profit Council

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Gary Kelso, chairman of AHCA Not-for-Profit Council
Gary Kelso, chairman of AHCA Not-for-Profit Council

Q: What does a not-for-profit council do for a mostly for-profit association like AHCA?

A: We represent well over 3,000 facilities nationwide. At times, there are silos, real or perceived. We have to break through them and communicate between all payer and facility types. There are more similarities than dissimilarities between for-profits and not-for-profits. Sometimes by being linked to a “for-profit organization,” other not-for-profits might think we have different reasons for what we do. We don't.

Q: What's your top goal this year?

A: We're really focusing on how we can interface with our congressional members better. We want one voice. Unless we have one voice, there will be a disconnect and real challenges for our decision-makers on Capitol Hill. 

Q: How can you help?

A: If you have a not-for-profit sitting there with a lawmaker, with its charitable mission and telling of the perspective and charitable work it does, telling the same story as those on the for-profit side, they say, “Now I get it.” 

Q: What else can NFPs do?

A: CCRCs are almost a mini-bundled approach to care. We've figured out ways to affiliate with other providers to bridge gaps and share information.

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